New Superatom Is Both Stable and Magnetic

New Superatom Is Both Stable and Magnetic

energy, Materials Science
JACS Spotlights March 22, 2022 Superatoms are small symmetric clusters of atoms with electronic states bunched together into closely packed shells. Like their individual-atom counterparts, superatoms with filled shells have the greatest electronic stability. Typical stable octahedral transition metal chalcogenide clusters have a single set of filled electron shells and they have no net spin magnetic moment outside an applied field.Now, Amymarie Bartholomew, Xavier Roy, Shiv Khanna, and co-workers have theoretically predicted a new type of cluster that would uniquely combine high stability and a large spin magnetic moment (DOI: 10.1021/jacs.2c00731). This theoretical cluster has two subshells: one with 57 valence electrons and one with 50, optimal numbers of electrons to create a large gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied orbitals. They synthesized this new cluster, [NEt4]5[Fe6S8(CN)6], which…
Read More
The electric vehicle grease industry finds its bearings

The electric vehicle grease industry finds its bearings

emerging technologies, energy
Evolving grease formulations help smooth the transition toward electric vehicles. TLT November 2021 Electric vehicles don't require gasoline, but they do require grease. Existing greases are OK for windshield wipers, door hinges, and window winder mechanisms, but the bearings and gears in the drive train are a different story. High operating temperatures and voltages are key concerns. As current densities increase, so does the risk of stray currents that can pit bearings. Typical electric motor speeds, currently around 15,000 rpm, are expected to exceed 20,000 rpm in the near future. /
Read More
The brave new world of electric vehicle fluids

The brave new world of electric vehicle fluids

emerging technologies, energy
Electric vehicle fluids differ in fundamental ways from those used for internal combustion engines—and from each other. TLT October 2021 • Electric vehicle (EV) transmission fluids, which multitask as lubricants and coolants, are likely to be formulated as vehicle design elements, with fill-for-life applications in mind.• EV fluid formulations may help dissipate stray electrical currents, and they must be compatible with the copper wiring and polymer seals and insulators with which they come into contact. • Thermal management fluids for battery and power electronics systems are an active area for development.
Read More
River deltas show electrical potential

River deltas show electrical potential

energy, environment
How in the world do you generate electricity from the slow-moving water in a river delta? Think about all the ways we have of generating electricity. You can turn a turbine using steam. You can place the turbine in a waterfall and have the falling water turn the blades, or build tall towers with windmill blades that spin in the wind. You can put a battery into your mobile phone, in between two strips of metal. These generators look very different, but they all have something in common: they are all situated in places where some kind of energy flows from one place to another, and they all tap into that flow to do some kind of work. Unless you put up some kind of barrier, if you put a…
Read More
Touring a Green Building

Touring a Green Building

emerging technologies, energy, environment, Uncategorized
This afternoon, I joined the Earth Ethics Committee of the Washington Ethical Society and friends for a tour of the Camille Kendall Academic Center of the Universities at Shady Grove (Rockville, MD). When this building received a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold certification, it was the largest building ever to receive this designation. The building is one of three main academic buildings on this suburban campus, which serves as a branch location for nine Maryland universities. Students at USG specialize in one of several career-oriented programs geared toward meeting the needs of regional businesses. One of the first things you notice as you enter is the terrazzo glass flooring, made from blue and green recycled glass and concrete. Just off the lobby is a cafe. The catering…
Read More
How did the Fukushima nuclear accident affect wildlife?

How did the Fukushima nuclear accident affect wildlife?

energy, environment, Uncategorized
On March 11, 2011, a tsunami, a giant wave set off by an earthquake, struck the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan. The tsunami caused a catastrophic failure of the power station and a release of radioactive material that has been rated second in magnitude only to the Chornobyl disaster. The extent of the radiological impact of this event on surrounding wildlife has been a contentious topic, but the results of a recent study are cautiously optimistic. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation oversaw a study by an international team of scientists, who evaluated the results of a 2011 environmental assessment of the area near the power plant and published their results earlier this year (Environ. Sci. Technol. Lett., 2014, 1, 198–203). The UN committee…
Read More
A World of Slow Drips

A World of Slow Drips

conference report, energy, environment, issues in the news, legislation, public perceptions, regulations
by Nancy McGuire, Wordchemist.com On January 24, a panel of seven journalists gathered at Washington, DC's, Wilson Center to brief an overflow crowd of policy wonks, issue advocates, writers and reporters, and other interested citizens on the likely hot topics in environment and energy for 2014. The annual event, co-sponsored by the Global Sustainability and Resilience Program, the Canada Institute, the Science and Technology Innovation Program, and the Society of Environmental Journalists, featured a lively audience Q&A session at the end. This is the last in a four-part series on this briefing. Dennis Dimick, executive editor of the environment at National Geographic, spoke of a nexus where food, water, and energy issues meet. Much of the petroleum extraction being done today, including water-intensive fracking operations, is being done in arid…
Read More
Keystone Capers and Ocean Issues

Keystone Capers and Ocean Issues

conference report, energy, environment, issues in the news, public perceptions
by Nancy McGuire, Wordchemist.com On January 24, a panel of seven journalists gathered at Washington, DC's, Wilson Center to brief an overflow crowd of policy wonks, issue advocates, writers and reporters, and other interested citizens on the likely hot topics in environment and energy for 2014. The annual event, co-sponsored by the Global Sustainability and Resilience Program, the Canada Institute, the Science and Technology Innovation Program, and the Society of Environmental Journalists, featured a lively audience Q&A session at the end. This is the third in a four-part series on this briefing. Opposition to Canada's Keystone Pipeline, a story that generated significant heat inside the Beltway last year, may be producing some unintended effects. "Canada is committed to developing its oil sands, Keystone or not," said Larry Pearl, Bloomberg BNA's…
Read More
Coal: Politics and Power Supplies

Coal: Politics and Power Supplies

conference report, energy, environment, issues in the news, legislation, regulations
by Nancy McGuire, Wordchemist.com On January 24, a panel of seven journalists gathered at Washington, DC's, Wilson Center to brief an overflow crowd of policy wonks, issue advocates, writers and reporters, and other interested citizens on the likely hot topics in environment and energy for 2014. The annual event, co-sponsored by the Global Sustainability and Resilience Program, the Canada Institute, the Science and Technology Innovation Program, and the Society of Environmental Journalists, featured a lively audience Q&A session at the end. This is the second in a four-part series on this briefing. Coal in U.S. Politics This year's U.S. midterm elections will increasingly influence the debate on the use, regulation, and export of coal, said Suzanne Goldenberg, the U.S. environmental correspondent for The Guardian. Coral Davenport, who covers climate and…
Read More